About six months ago, my Capresso C2000 super automatic espresso machine started having problems. First, the expelled pucks of used coffee grounds were very crumbly and wet, when they had used to be fairly dry and, well, puck-shaped. Then, more coffee went into the coffee grounds disposal box then into my waiting cup.

I looked up into the machine with a flashlight and spotted a torn O-ring around the screen. Unfortunately, Capresso wouldn’t sell me a replacement O-ring. Over the following months I purchased several plumbing grade O-rings, but they were either just too small or just too large. Finally, I gave in and decided to spend the money to have Capresso fix it for me. For all I know, there could have been more wrong than just the O-ring. I’ll keep telling myself that.

The last time I sent it back, it cost $150 to be repaired. Since that covered shipping by UPS both ways between California and New Jersey for a fairly large kitchen applicance, that seemed fairly reasonable. They also fixed a few other minor annoyances that I hadn’t even mentioned to them. Whether due to inflation or the fact that the machine is now nearly 10 years old, the flat fee for a repair on a C2000 is now $200.

Given that I bought the machine at a big discount from Whole Latte Love, the $350 that I have now spent for repairs and general maintenance over all these years doesn’t seem that bad.  Especially considering how much enjoyment I’ve gotten from the great cups of coffee it makes.